Weather–you can never know too much…


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I got the NetATMO rain gauge yesterday. Barb took one look at it and said “How many weather stations do you have.” I responded “not enough.” She grimaced – I suspect under her breath she was uttering geek.

Netatmo is a great home weather station. It publishes your weather information to their web server so you can log into your weather no matter where you are (like connecting from Hawaii when it is –3 in DC would be a fun use of the remote capability). I Still think NOAA and NetAtmo ought to get together and do a data feed share. Today Netatmo supports the NOAA feeds in their software. It would be really cool to see a heat map of an area based on lots of points of data. An aggregated weather feed application if you would.

I also have a Davis weather station on the back deck. It is a more professional weather station and gives real time rain and wind velocity and direction information that NetAtmo doesn’t today. Well Netatmo has a rain gauge but I haven’t installed it yet. I suspect they have a wind gauge in the works but to date I haven’t seen that on their product page.

The Davis system also allows you to do weather data mining. It keeps track of 10 days of data so you can do a compare and contrast. For example, we live near DC, DC has a lot of concrete. It is normally 3-5 degrees warmer than where we live (near the woods in fact about 23 miles North of DC). The other interesting thing of course is the amount of rain. It truly varies across the region we live in. So its nice to be able to look out and see what the rain is where we actually are.

It is also a great opportunity to teach a fun science lesson that in the end is extremely useful. If you know how to read the weather where you are, you are less likely to find yourself in a compromised position. I will post a fun STEAM/STEM activity later around this.

.doc

Scott Andersen

IASA Fellow.

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