wander project what dad saw


I am going to mix in the what my father saw with the wander project, but I won’t go into a 20 plus day blast of either for a while. Today, some interesting pictures, a couple of my father and one of my mother. I spoke yesterday about trying to transition and the difficulty that we can have at times, moving from dad to friend. I know its hard because I struggle with it myself now. My father struggled with it as well. But I do know one thing my father loved and respected me. Many times after we moved to Maryland in 2011 he would remark on things I shared in my blog or things from one of my books. That always made me happy and still does, my mother often comments to me on things posted.

Sometimes, she even agrees with my memories. Sometimes, she does not agree. Either way, it is wonderful to hear!  Dad traveled a lot after we came home from Thailand. He did a little before but traveled more after. I do remember one trip he took, we went to the homecoming parade and managed to lock ourselves out of our house in Sherwood Oaks. In fairness, we didn’t lock ourselves out of the house mom’s purse was moved and she didn’t know it while we were at the parade.  I ended up climbing in the only open window in our house (unlocked) in my father’s study. In the process of getting into the room, I knocked my fathers bust of John Kennedy over. It ended up breaking the nose of the bust!

After Bangkok, dad traveled quite a bit. He was in Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, visited Malaysia and Fiji and Papua New Guinea. In all cases, he was helping the nations education system start a science education program. He was a long time member and president of the National Science Teachers Association in the US. NSTA was in Washington DC, so dad traveled often to DC. Long, many long years before we moved to Maryland. Of course, dad also went back to Thailand as well. Over the course of the years after we returned to the US, mom and dad sponsored many Thai Students at Indiana University. Dad believed and so did mom that you have to, as John Kennedy said “ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.”

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